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“Arabs think what Hitler did was a good thing”

The Qur’an depicts the Jews as inveterately evil and bent on destroying the well-being of the Muslims. They are the strongest of all people in enmity toward the Muslims (5:82); they fabricate things and falsely ascribe them to Allah (2:79; 3:75, 3:181); they claim that Allah’s power is limited (5:64); they love to listen to lies (5:41); they disobey Allah and never observe his commands (5:13). They are disputing and quarreling (2:247); hiding the truth and misleading people (3:78); staging rebellion against the prophets and rejecting their guidance (2:55); being hypocritical (2:14, 2:44); giving preference to their own interests over the teachings of Muhammad (2:87); wishing evil for people and trying to mislead them (2:109); feeling pain when others are happy or fortunate (3:120); being arrogant about their being Allah’s beloved people (5:18); devouring people’s wealth by subterfuge (4:161); slandering the true religion and being cursed by Allah (4:46); killing the prophets (2:61); being merciless and heartless (2:74); never keeping their promises or fulfilling their words (2:100); being unrestrained in committing sins (5:79); being cowardly (59:13-14); being miserly (4:53); being transformed into apes and pigs for breaking the Sabbath (2:63-65; 5:59-60; 7:166); and more. They are under Allah’s curse (9:30), and Muslims should wage war against them and subjugate them under Islamic hegemony (9:29).

“At a site of Nazi terror, Muslim refugees reckon with Germany’s past,”

by Isaac Stanley-Becker and Alexandra Rojkov, Washington Post, August 10, 2017:

ORANIENBURG, Germany — He walked across the bleak expanse of what was once the Sachsenhausen concentration camp, toward the gas chamber that had been stocked with liquid Zyklon B, and posed the question that still strains the conscience of modern German society.

“How was it possible?” Osman Jamo asked.

Yet he also wondered why the site, where barbed wire and guard towers stood dark against the brilliant sunshine of a summer afternoon in this town north of Berlin, had been preserved at all.

“Maybe the Jews want to keep these places going so they can be seen as victims forever,” he said of Sachsenhausen, which was mainly used for political prisoners but by the beginning of 1945 held 11,100 Jews.

Jamo’s response is not the usual reaction toEurope’s [sic] postwar conversion of concentration camps into memorials and museums, places of atonement and civic education that ask visitors never to forget the Nazi past.

But this was not a typical tour — nor was Jamo a typical visitor. This was an effort to sensitize Muslim migrants to the dark history of the country that today offers them asylum. Two years ago, Jamo, 38, fled to Germany from Kobane, a Syrian city occupied by Islamic State militants in late 2014. His ambivalent response to the suffering of Jews at Sachsenhausen speaks to centuries-old religious strife as well as to the political conflict that has torn the Middle East since Israel’s founding after World War II.

At the same time, the refugee’s views reflect the moral quandaries posed by mass migration for a nation rebuilt after the Holocaust on a set of bedrock principles that includes responsibility to the Jewish people.

“There is an expectation that people coming to Germany will assume that sense of historical duty,” said Fatih Uenal, a German-Turkish political psychologist who is founding a vocational training program for refugees in Frankfurt. “That makes the higher incidence of anti-Semitic views among Muslims hard to talk about, and so we haven’t found a good way of engaging different sorts of people about the violence that went on here.”…

The spectacle of brutality on display at Sachsenhausen did not awe Jamo, a former photographer who had known daily violence in Syria. No matter the direct perpetrator of the violence Jamo had witnessed, the greatest cause of conflict in the region, he said, was Israel.

“Israeli aggression is the most basic problem,” he said….

The history that binds Germany to Israel is interpreted differently by many in the Arab world, Jamo said: “The Arabs think what Hitler did was a good thing, because he freed them from the Jews.”

He spoke bluntly before a video camera that followed him around the site of the former camp. His remarks will appear in a documentary film about how refugees in Germany understand the mass murder of Jews.

Jamo was one of only two refugees involved in R.future-TV who agreed to participate in the film project on Holocaust history. Germany’s treatment of Jews has been a difficult topic of debate, said Alkomi, a Christian whose family escaped to Germany from Syria when he was 9. At a meeting of the group last month, one man admitted, “In some ways, we think of the Jews just like the Nazis did.”…

“A lot of Muslim refugees,” said Josef Schuster, president of the Central Council of Jews in Germany “grew up in countries where hatred of Jews and of Israel is normal.” Many know little about the Holocaust, he said, “and some even admire Hitler.”…

In Iraq, anti-Semitic influences are pervasive, said Mohammed Kareem, the other refu­gee who had agreed to participate in the film. But Kareem, 34, who had been a police officer in Baghdad, spoke with his back to the camera, worried for his family still in Iraq if he were to be identified as “a friend of the Jews.”

“Everywhere — whether on the TV, from Imams or at school — we hear, ‘Jews are not good,’ and we don’t know any Jews to see them differently,” Kareem said. Since arriving in Germany in 2015, he has encountered several Jews who volunteer at a Berlin church that works with refugees. And now he is asking himself, “‘Why does my country say Jews are not good?’ Their armies — that’s different.”…

“If Germany paid reparations to Israel, then Americans should pay for what they did in Iraq,” Kareem said. By the end of the day, Jamo was firm on one point: “We are definitely still against the Zionists.”…

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Rare photos showing Jerusalem’s Mufti al-Husseini visit to Nazi camps

AN ANONYMOUS PURCHASER BOUGHT RARE PHOTOGRAPHS FROM A GERMAN DEALER SHOWING HAJ AMIN AL-HUSSEINI TOURING NAZI CAMPS, ACCOMPANIED BY NAZI OFFICIALS AROUND 1943. HE NOW SELLS THEM THROUGH THE KEDEM AUCTION HOUSE, JERUSALEM, ISRAEL.

The six photographs documents a visit to Germany by Mufti Haj Muhammad Amin al-Husseini. [Germany, ca. 1943].

The photographs show al-Husseini, accompanied by a number of Nazi senior officials, dressed in uniforms, and a number of government officials, dressed in civilian clothes, during a tour apparently held at a camp in Germany (possibly, a camp of The German Labour Front).

All the photographs are marked on reverse with the stamp “Photo-Gerhards Trebbin”. The photographer’s mark attests that they were developed in Trebbin, Germany, and may have been shot in its environs.

These photographs, previously unknown, document an unidentified visit to Germany by al-Husseini.

We were unable to identify the men in the photographs. However, according to some speculations, among the photographed are possibly:

  • the Croatian politician Mile Budak (a member of the Ustase Party who served as Croatian envoy to Germany in 1941-1943),
  • Iraqi politician Rashid Ali al-Gaylani,
  • Fritz Grobba (the German ambassador to Iraq, later in charge of Middle Eastern affairs at the German Foreign Ministry, known for his ties to al-Husseini and Rashid Ali al-Gaylani during al-Gaylani’s revolt against the Iraqi government and in the following years)
  • and the Austrian politician Arthur Seyss-Inquart.

Haj Muhammad Amin al-Husseini (1895?-1974) served as the Mufti of Jerusalem during the British Mandate period, in the years 1921-1937, and was known as one of the most important and influential leaders of the Palestinian Arabs and the Palestinian national movement.

In 1937, after the British outlawed the Arab Higher Committee and dispersed the Supreme Muslim Council, al-Husseini fled to Lebanon, where he stayed for about two years before moving to Iraq.

In Iraq he joined the politician Rashid Ali al-Gaylani and contributed significantly to the planning and organization of the revolt led by al-Gaylani in 1941. Following the revolt, al-Gaylani established a pro-Nazi government that demanded the expulsion of the British from Iraq, but his government did not last for long, and with the collapse of the coup, al-Husseini and al-Gaylani left Iraq.

Al-Husseini first traveled to Fascist Italy (where he even met Mussolini), then to Nazi Germany. Al-Gaylani also went to Germany.

Haj Amin al-Husseini’s ties with the Nazis, initiated before he had arrived in Germany, grew closer during his stay there. He had contacts with the German Foreign Ministry, with the upper echelons of the S.S. and the Gestapo, and even met with Adolf Hitler (their first meeting was in November 1941).

One of al-Husseini’s major contributions to the German war effort as part of his activities in favor of the Axis Powers was the recruitment of fighters to the 13th Waffen Mountain Division of the SS in 1943. This division, called Handschar, was established by the Germans in the region of Croatia under the rule of the pro-Nazi Ustase Party (which then included Bosnia and Herzegovina). Most of the recruits were from among the Muslim population of Bosnia and Herzegovina and the recruitment was carried out with the encouragement of al-Husseini, who was sent there especially by the German authorities.

In addition, al-Husseini established the “Arab Institute for the Study of the Jewish Question” in Berlin – an institute founded with German funding and constituting the Berlin parallel to the “Institute for the Study of the Jewish Problem” active in Frankfurt, whose declared objective was the expulsion of the Jews from German territory.

As a result of these and other activities, al-Husseini was included at the end of World War II in the list of “war criminals” of the Yugoslav Committee Investigating the War Crimes of the Occupiers and their Collaborators.

Al-Husseini’s relations with the Axis Powers have been closely studied and still arouse questions. Some associate his collaboration with his enthusiasm for German policies towards the Jews and their plan for a “Final Solution”, and even with an aspiration on his part to expand the genocide to Palestine as well.

Islamic alliance is not exclusively with the left.

6 photographs, approx. 6.5 x 9.5 cm. Good condition. Some stains, tears and creases. Estimation: $20000 – $30000.

EDITORS NOTE: This column originally appeared on The Geller Report.

VIDEO: Muslims give Nazi salute screaming ‘Adolf Hitler, ‘Allahu Akbar’

Nothing to be concerned about. If German authorities start a few youth basketball leagues and enroll these fellows in jobs programs, this problem will clear right up.

Video thanks to Vlad Tepes.

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New edition of Hitler’s Mein Kampf goes on sale in German bookshops — sells out instantly

At such a time as this……

The timing on this is suspicious. Mein Kampf is a bestseller in many Muslim countries. Europe, and most particularly Germany, is morphing into a Muslim state at warped speed. The rise in Jew-hatred in Europe is tied directly to the increase in Muslim immigration. Islamic antisemitism is in the Quran.

“Mein Kampf” in Arabic is “My jihad.” Perf.

“New edition of Hitler’s Mein Kampf goes on sale in German bookshops and sells out instantly,” By Gianluca Mezzofiore For Mailonline, 9 January 2016

2,000-page critical edition of anti-Semitic rant hit bookstores on 8 January
Mein Kampf had more than 15,000 orders despite only printing 4,000 copies
German state of Bavaria refused to publish book for 70 years
Copyright expired on January and new edition will cost 59 euros (£43)
Munich’s Institute for Contemporary History curated annotated edition
Jewish community says Holocaust survivors ‘will be offended’
Hitler wrote notorious racist manifesto while in jail in 1924

Adolf Hitler’s autobiography Mein Kampf was an instant sellout when it hit bookstores in Germany for the first time since the Second World War.

More than 15,000 advance orders were placed, despite the initial print of 4,000 copies, with one copy even put up for resale on Amazon.de for €9,999.99 (£7,521.43).

Mein Kampf, which means My Struggle, returned into the public domain on January 1.

mein1

A copy of Hitler’s Mein Kampf – A Critical Edition stands on a display table in a bookshop in Munich, Germany

A 1941 edition of Adolf Hitler’s ‘Mein Kampf’ (‘My Struggle’) lies at the library of the Deutsches Historisches Museum (German Historical Museum)

Ian Kershaw, a Briton who is a leading biographer of Hitler, joined Friday’s book presentation and said it was ‘high time for a rigorously academic edition of Mein Kampf’ to be made available.

‘For years, I have considered the lifting of the ban on publication long overdue,’ Kershaw said.

‘Censorship is almost always pointless in the long term in a free society, and only contributes to creating a negative myth, making a forbidden text more mysterious and awakening an inevitable fascination with the inaccessible.’

Germany’s main Jewish group, the Central Council of Jews, said it has no objections to the critical edition but strongly supports ongoing efforts to prevent any new ‘Mein Kampf’ without annotations. Its president, Josef Schuster, said he hopes the critical edition will ‘contribute to debunking Hitler’s inhuman ideology and counteracting anti-Semitism.’

Copies of a 2,000-page, two-volume annotated version of Mein Kampf will go on sale on January 9 after three years of labour by scholars at Munich’s Institute for Contemporary History.The new version, which will cost 59 euros (£43), has some 3,500 annotations.

Authors argue that the critical edition will serve to ‘deconstruct and put into context Hitler’s writing’ with the aim to demystify the 800-page rant.

The annotated version looks at key historical questions, the institute said, including: ‘How were his theses conceived? What objectives did he have? And most important: which counterarguments do we have, given our knowledge today of the countless claims, lies and assertions of Hitler?’
mein3

Jewish community in Germany criticised the decision to reprint the anti-Semitic book, questioning whether it was necessary to propagate the inflammatory text again

Ronald Lauder, president of the World Jewish Congress, said ‘it would be best to leave ‘Mein Kampf’ where it belongs: the poison cabinet of history’

Education Minister Johanna Wanka has argued that such a version should be introduced to all classrooms across Germany, saying it would serve to ensure that ‘Hitler’s comments do not remain unchallenged’.

‘Pupils will have questions and it is only right that these can be addressed in classes,’ she said.

But the Jewish community in Germany criticised the decision to reprint the anti-Semitic book, questioning whether it was necessary to propagate the inflammatory text again.

Charlotte Knobloch, leader of the Jewish community in Munich, said she could not imagine seeing ‘Mein Kampf’ in shop windows.

Ronald Lauder, president of the World Jewish Congress, told AFP that not only would ‘Holocaust survivors be offended by the sale of the anti-Semitic work in bookstores again’, but that he also failed to see a need for a critical edition.

‘Unlike other works that truly deserve to be republished as annotated editions, ‘Mein Kampf’ does not,’ he said, arguing that academics and historians already have easy access to the text.

First edition of Mein Kampf signed by Adolf Hitler. The Nazi dictator wrote the book in 1924 while he was in jail in Bavaria for treason after his failed coup.

Versions of the book will also hit bookstands in France, causing an outcry in the Jewish community there mein7

A German edition of Adolf Hitler’s ‘Mein Kampf’ (My Struggle) is pictured at the Berlin Central and Regional Library

And even though it should be studied and German students taught about the devastating impact it had, Lauder said ‘the idea that to do so requires an annotated edition with thousands of pages of text is nonsense.’

‘Now, it would be best to leave ‘Mein Kampf’ where it belongs: the poison cabinet of history.’

Versions of the book will also hit bookstands in France, causing an outcry in the Jewish community there.

Roger Cukierman, the president of the council of Jewish institutions, called the planned French reprints ‘a disaster’.

‘Such horror can already be found on the internet. What would happen if Mein Kampf also becomes bedside reading?’ he said.
BANNING THE NAZI MANIFESTO: HISTORY OF HITLER’S MEIN KAMPF

Mein Kampf, which is partly autobiographical, was written by Hitler in 1924 while he was in jail in Bavaria for treason after his failed Beer Hall Putsch.

The book set out two ideas that he put into practice as Germany’s leader going into World War II: annexing neighbouring countries to gain ‘Lebensraum’, or ‘living space’, for Germans; and his hatred of Jews, which led to the Holocaust.

Some 12.4 million copies were published in Germany until 1945, some of which can be found in academic libraries.

The ban will continue in several European countries that were occupied by Nazi Germany, including Austria and the Netherlands.

In Turkey, India and Brazil, the book is easily found. More than 30,000 copies have been sold since 2004 in Turkey.

Read more.

EDITORS NOTE: This column originally appeared on PamelaGeller.com. To stay on top of what’s really happening please follow Pamela on Twitter and like her on Facebook here.

Muslim cleric: I converted Hitler’s grandson to Islam

Hitler did not have a grandson, unless it has been a very well-kept secret. The noteworthy aspect of this is that the cleric would boast about it: he knows that Hitler is still quite popular in the Islamic world, where there is a great deal of admiration for his genocide of the Jews.

“Iranian Cleric: I Converted Hitler’s Grandson to Islam,” by Adam Kredo, Washington Free Beacon, December 17, 2015 (thanks to The Religion of Peace):

An Iranian cleric recently claimed in a sermon that he is responsible for converting Hitler’s grandson to Islam.

The cleric, a leading imam in Mahmoud Abad, a small city in northern Iran, claimed in his most recent Friday prayer address the he is responsible for converting Hitler’s grandson, who he did not mention by name.

“When I asked him [Hitler’s grandson] why he chose Islam, he answered because he found Iranians altruistic and family-oriented people,” the imam said…

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EDITORS NOTE: The featured image is of Adolf Hitler with a boy. who was not his grandson.

How Nazism Explains ‘Moderate’ and ‘Radical’ Islam by Raymond Ibrahim

If Islamic doctrines are inherently violent, why isn’t every single Muslim in the world—that is, approximately 1.5 billion people—violent?

This question represents one of Islam’s most popular apologetics: because not all Muslims are violent, intolerant, or sponsor terrorism—a true statement—Islam itself must be innocent.

Let’s briefly consider this logic.

First, there are, in fact, many people who identify themselves as Muslims but who do not necessarily adhere to or support Islam’s more supremacist and intolerant doctrines.  If you have lived in a Muslim majority nation, you would know this to be true.

The all-important question is, what do such Muslims represent?  Are they following a legitimate, “moderate,” version of Islam—one more authentic than the terrorist variety?  That’s what the media, politicians, and academics would have us believe.

The best way to answer this question is by analogy:

German Nazism is a widely condemned ideology, due to its (“Aryan/white”) supremacist element.  But the fact is, many Germans who were members or supporters of the Nazi party were “good” people.  They did not believe in persecuting Jews and other “non-Aryans,” and some even helped such “undesirables” escape, at no small risk to themselves.

Consider Oskar Schindler.  An ethnic German and formal member of the Nazi party, he went to great lengths to save Jews from slaughter.

How do we reconcile his good deed with his bad creed?

Was Schindler practicing a legitimate,  “moderate,” form of Nazism?  Or is it more reasonable to say that he subscribed to some tenets of National Socialism, but when it came to killing fellow humans in the name of racial supremacy, his humanity rose above his allegiance to Nazism?…

Keep reading

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