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As Iranian women cast off hijab as symbol of oppression, UK Foreign Office celebrates World Hijab Day

“I can’t see the Foreign Office promoting Christianity or the handing out of crosses.”

Indeed. In the shattered, staggering, dhimmi UK, only Islam gets this fawning treatment. And it’s particularly despicable this year, for while non-Muslim women in the UK Foreign Office were donning hijabs in solidarity with hijabbed Muslimas, reinforcing the false claim that hijab-wearing women are persecuted and harassed in Britain and the West, Iranian women are risking years in prison for taking off their hijabs. The UK Foreign Office should be standing in solidarity with them and calling for freedom and the rights of women, but it will not do so — that would be “Islamophobic.”

“Foreign Office staff invited to wear hijab for the day: Civil service accused of promoting ‘oppression of women’ after giving out free headscarves,” by Ian Drury, Daily Mail, February 7, 2018:

Mandarins at the Foreign Office invited staff to wear Islamic headscarves for the day, claiming they symbolised ‘liberation, respect and security’.

The department was accused of backing the ‘institutional oppression of women’ by giving away taxpayer-funded headscarves at a walk-in event to mark World Hijab Day.

The event was held as women in ultra-conservative Iran burned their headscarves in protest at being forced to wear them or face arrest and prison.

Many Muslim women across the world have shunned the hijab – which covers the hair and neck but not the face – as an antiquated, oppressive, religious tool.

The event was last Thursday, just days before Britain marked the 100th anniversary of women being given the vote….

Anti-hijab activist Masih Alinejad told Reuters: ‘We are fighting against the most visible symbol of oppression. These women are saying, “It is enough – it is the 21st century and we want to be our true selves.”’

Tory MP Andrew Bridgen said: ‘I’d like to know whose bright idea this was. It is ridiculous, a complete waste of taxpayers’ money and not the business of a Government department.

‘I can’t see the Foreign Office promoting Christianity or the handing out of crosses.’

An internal email to Foreign Office staff said the event was taking place on February 1 between midday and 2pm inside the department’s headquarters at Whitehall.

It read: ‘Would you like to try on a hijab or learn why Muslim women wear the headscarf? Come along to our walk-in event. Free scarves for all those that choose to wear it for the day or part of the day.

‘Muslim women, along with followers of many other religions, choose to wear the hijab. Many find liberation, respect and security through wearing it. #StrongInHijab. Join us for #WorldHijabDay.’ Posters for the event, featuring Foreign Office branding, were circulated. World Hijab Day, an annual event, was also marked in the Scottish Parliament…

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EDITORS NOTE: This column originally appeared on Jihad Watch.

Iranian Woman Arrested for Removing Hijab Refuses to Repent Despite Facing 10-years in Prison

Narges Hosseini is an actual feminist. Where are the feminists of the West speaking up for her right not to wear the hijab? Linda Sarsour? Anyone?

Women such as Narges Hosseini and Vida Movahed deserve the wholehearted support of all free people. That they do not receive it from the supposedly feminist Left reveals the self-serving hypocrisy of Western feminists.

“Woman Arrested For Removing Hijab in Tehran Refuses to Repent Despite Facing 10 Years in Prison,” Center for Human Rights in Iran, February 6, 2018:

Narges Hosseini, who was arrested for protesting Iran’s compulsory hijab, refused to appear in court to face charges punishable by up to 10 years, including “encouraging immorality or prostitution.”

“Ms. Hosseini did not even appear in court to express remorse for her action. She said she objects to the forced hijab and considers it her legal right to express her protest,” Hosseini’s lawyer, Nasrin Sotoudeh, told the Center for Human Rights in Iran (CHRI) on February 5, 2018.

Hosseini, 32, has been in detention since January 29, 2018. She was unable to pay the $135,000 USD bail set by the judge presiding over her case.

She was arrested on January 29, 2018, for posting a photo on social media of herself standing on a bench holding her white headscarf like a flag on Tehran’s Revolution’s Street.

All women in Iran are required to cover their hair and bodies in public.

Vida Movahed was the first woman to be arrested after she did the same thing in late December 2017 in Tehran. The act of removing your headscarf in public and waving it like a flag has become a symbol for the “Girls of Revolution Street” movement, which advocates choice over compulsion for women’s clothing.

“Ms. Hosseini is being held in difficult circumstances in Gharchak Prison [south of Tehran] but she is not prepared to say she is sorry,” Sotoudeh, a prominent human rights lawyer, told CHRI. “She believes she’s innocent.”

Hosseini is facing the charges of, “openly committing a harām [sinful] act” and “violating public prudency” under Article 638 and “encouraging immorality or prostitution” under Article 639.

According to Article 639 of Iran’s Islamic Penal Code, “The following individuals shall be sentenced to one year to 10 years’ imprisonment… A – Anyone who establishes or directs a place of immorality or prostitution. B – Anyone who facilitates or encourages people to commit immorality or prostitution.”

Article 638 states, “Anyone in public places and roads who openly commits a harām [sinful] act, in addition to the punishment provided for the act, shall be sentenced to two months’ imprisonment or up to 74 lashes; and if they commit an act that is not punishable but violates public prudency, they shall only be sentenced to 10 days to two months’ imprisonment or up to 74 lashes.”

Hosseini’s lawyer also rejected a senior judicial official’s claim that her client is a drug addict….

EDITORS NOTE: This column originally appeared on Jihad Watch.

Iranian pro-freedom protesters praise Trump for standing with Iranian people, say ‘shame on Trudeau’

“It’s all about freedom, it’s not just about the economy.”

EDITORS NOTE: This video first appeared on Jihad Watch.

New York Times pushes Iran’s propaganda in its coverage of anti-government protests

The New York Times is standing with the Islamic regime in Iran and Iran proxy Hizb’Allah, which has, like the Times, “dismissed” the protests. Here the Times gives a full airing to the mullahs’ preposterous claims that foreign agents engineered the protests. There is no entity that hates America that the Times will not stand with and propagandize for, no matter how repressive. The Islamic regime now is torturing and killing its own people, solely for the crime of not wanting to live in a sharia dictatorship. That’s enough for the destroyers and saboteurs at the Times to regard them as enemies.

This unconscionable coverage epitomizes everything that is wrong with the enemedia establishment.

“Iranians, Like Their Leaders, See Foreign Hand in Protests,” by Margaret Coker, New York Times, January 3, 2018 (thanks to Amil Imani):

LONDON — Iran’s supreme leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, has blamed unnamed foreign “enemies” for the antigovernment protests that have swept his country for the past week, putting the demonstrators at risk of being accused of espionage or treason.

The accusation resonates for many Iranians, whose country has long been subject to foreign interference, from the American- and British-led coup in the 1950s to more recent efforts by the United States and Israel to sabotage Iran’s nuclear program. President Trump’s public support for the protesters has only reinforced suspicions of a foreign hand at work.

While there has been no evidence that foreign governments orchestrated the protests, several countries are now trying to decide how to support a goal they share with many of the demonstrators: a less corrupt, more democratic and more open Iranian government.

The State Department urged Iran on Tuesday not to restrict access to social media services like Instagram and messaging platforms like Telegram, which the protesters have used to spread word of anti-government gatherings. It even encouraged Iranians to use virtual private networks to sidestep government censorship, advice Iranians see as interference.

Diplomats and analysts said discussions were underway in the capitals of Britain, Israel and other countries on whether or how to support the demonstrators.

American intelligence officials and Iran watchers say the protests appear to have started organically.

The demonstrations, which are widespread and amorphous, do not match the playbook that Western intelligence agencies have used to mount covert operations in Iran — namely, sustained resource-intense operations that focus on the narrowly defined and measurable goal of sabotaging the alleged nuclear weapons program, they say.

For now, they say, the evidence points to one catalyst of the unrest: widespread discontent with the government.

“You don’t need Americans or Israeli or British intelligence to convince people in Iran that there is a small ruling elite that is controlling the country’s economy and ruining it,” says Meir Javedanfar, a lecturer on Iranian studies at the Interdisciplinary Center in Herzliya, Israel.

A former American intelligence official said it was implausible that a foreign agency could organize protests in dozens of cities without the Iranian government catching wind of it beforehand. Additionally, Western spy agencies are leery of operations that rely on mass demonstrations, which have a high risk of failure and cannot be easily controlled, the official said.

“Certainly, the West doesn’t have the ground game to engage in that kind of activism, nor do Iran’s regional adversaries,” said Suzanne Maloney, the deputy director of the foreign policy program at the Brookings Institution and a former adviser to senior State Department officials on Iran.

That logic has not stopped Iranian officials from pointing fingers outside their borders.

On Wednesday, the government announced the arrest of an unidentified citizen of an unidentified European country who “had been trained by espionage organizations in Europe,” the Tasnim news agency reported.

Iran has also accused Saudi Arabia, its main regional rival, of fomenting unrest. On Tuesday, the head of Iran’s National Security Council, Ali Shamkhani, told a Lebanese television station that the Saudis were responsible for 27 percent of all anti-Iran hashtags on Twitter….

EDITORS NOTE: This column originally appeared in The Geller Report.

Iranians are Ultimately Protesting Islamic [Sharia] Law by Raymond Ibrahim

What began on December 28 as local protests against high food prices in the northern city of Mashhad, Iran, has spiraled into mass protests consisting of some hundreds of thousands of Iranians in some two dozen cities, including if not especially Tehran, the seat of government. So far over 20 protesters have been killed and many hundreds arrested in what has been widely described as “the most serious internal crisis the country has faced this decade.”

The protests have morphed from mundane topics concerning the economy to more existential topics concerning Islamic leadership. Reportedly hundreds of thousands of protesters have been heard shouting “We don’t want an Islamic Republic,” and calling blessings on Reza Shah, the staunch secularist and political reformer who did much to Westernize Iran, until his son and successor, Muhammad Reza Shah, was deposed during the Islamic Revolution of 1979. According to Mideast media, women — such as Maryam Rajavi — are spearheading the current protests (and symbolically rejecting Islamic impositions by publicly removing their hijabs).

Even the Iranian regime sees the current unrest as a revolt against Islam. In his initial remarks after demonstrations first erupted, Supreme Leader Ayatollah Khamenei said, “All those who are against the Islamic Republic … have all joined forces in order to create problems for the Islamic Republic and the Islamic Revolution” (note the recurrent and telling adjective “Islamic”).

Even so, “mainstream media” see growing poverty and frustration at the lack of social freedoms as the only reasons behind the current unrest. Overlooked in their analysis is that, because Islam is not meant to be a “spiritual thing” one does privately, but is rather a complete system of governance, permeating the whole of private and social life, the ongoing protests in Iran, while ostensibly revolving around economic, social, and political issues, are ultimately protests against Islamic teachings concerning economic, social, and political issues, which the Islamic Republic of Iran has been imposing on the populace since coming to power in 1979.

This is evident even in the new rallying cry of the protestors — “Death to the Dictator” — in reference to Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei himself. By its very nature, Islamic law — both Sunni and Shia — calls for dictatorial rule. So long as the caliph, sultan, or emir governs society according to Sharia, Muslims must obey him — even if he is a despicable and cruel personage. After examining a number of Islamic rulings from authoritative exegetes, as well as a number of statements attributed to Muslim prophet Muhammad and in the Koran concerning the importance for Muslims to follow Islamic law — which is the only relevant question of when Muslims should and should not seek to overthrow their ruler — Ayman al-Zawahiri writes,

To summarize: It is forbidden to overthrow a tyrant, but it is a duty to overthrow an infidel. If the ruler is despotic, it is unlawful for a Muslim to rally other Muslims in order to condemn him, for if they do so then they become the aggressors and it becomes incumbent for the sultan to fight them (The Al Qaeda Reader, p. 122).

As it happens, the social oppression currently being protested against in Iran — from second-class status for women, to bans on all forms of expression critical of Islam, its prophet, and his representative on earth — is mandated by Islamic law, thereby making the protesters “the aggressors.”

But even the economic aspects of the protests are largely by-products of Islamist aspirations. As Donald Trump tweeted last Friday, the Iranian “people are finally getting wise as to how their money and wealth is being stolen and squandered on terrorism.” Indeed, the economic suffering of the people has come at a time when the regime has grown rich — not least by Barack Obama giving them over $100 billion as part of a nuclear deal. The reason for the disparity is that the regime has been and continues to spend much of its wealth in trying to realize its stated Islamic ideals; that is, it prefers supporting Hezbollah (currently Forbes wealthiest terrorist organization) and Hamas (third wealthiest) against Islam’s arch “infidel” enemy, Israel, in the name of and for the greater glory of Allah, rather than feed its people.

Incidentally, because the right to protest is a given in the West, and thus occurs often, including over trivial and/or absurd matters — as when university students planned a “sh*t-in,” occupying restrooms as a way of demanding more “gender-neutral facilities” — the grave consequences of the current protests in Iran (which are unsurprisingly also connected to Islam) are as underestimated in the West as they are indicative of just how frustrated many Iranians are:

Protesters could also potentially face the death penalty when their cases come to trial, according to the head of Tehran’s Revolutionary Court, the AP reported. Iran’s semiofficial Tasnim news agency quoted Mousa Ghazanfarabadi as saying: “Obviously one of their charges can be Moharebeh,” or waging war against God [Allah], which is a death penalty offense in Iran.

Moharebeh is precisely what al-Zawahiri was referring to in the above excerpt: the only legitimate reason to overthrow an Islamic ruler is his failure to govern according to Islam — which Khamenei and his regime can hardly be accused of (from a Shia prism, that is). Seeking to depose him because he is personally corrupt, despotic, cruel, or spending more money on jihad than food is forbidden, and transforms the protesters into aggressors against Allah, a crime worthy of punishment, including death.

Iranian resistance urges UN to recognize ‘legitimate right of people of Iran to overthrow ruling religious fascism’

This is extraordinary and world-historical. But they shouldn’t expect any satisfaction from the thoroughly compromised United Nations, a tool of the Organization of Islamic Cooperation.

“Iranian resistance issues list of demands urging UN to take action,” Al Arabiya, January 5, 2018:

The Iranian Resistance urged the UN Security Council to defend the legitimate and inalienable right of the Iranian people to overthrow the religious fascism ruling Iran and to attain the freedom for which they have been demonstrating, in a statement issued Friday.

The Resistance also requested that the Security Council to strongly condemn the mullahs’ regime and hold it accountable for killing defenseless and unarmed demonstrators.

The regime actions constitute a clear crime against humanity, and confronting them is the responsibility of the United Nations, the statement said.

According to reliable reports obtained by the Iranian Resistance, at least 50 protesters have been shot and killed by the Revolutionary Guards during the first eight days of the uprising, and more than 3,000 have been arrested. Children as young as 12 or 13 years old are among those killed.

The actual number of martyrs and detained is much more; a reality that the Iranian regime is trying hard to hide….

In welcoming today’s meeting on Iran’s uprising, the Iranian Resistance emphasizes the need for the following actions to be taken by the UN Security Council:

1. Recognizing the legitimate right of the people of Iran to overthrow the ruling religious fascism and establish their own freedom and sovereignty.

2. Strongly condemning and holding accountable the Iranian regime for the slaughter and mass arrests of defenseless and unarmed protesters.

3. Sanctioning the regime for systematic violations of human rights, including the 1988 massacre and the killings during the current uprising.

4. Condemning restrictions on the Internet and social networks, and ensuring the public’s free access to information.

5. Enforcing binding decisions for the release of thousands of arrested demonstrators and for the establishment of a monitoring system; and warning the Iranian regime that more serious actions will be taken should present trends continue.

EDITORS NOTE: The featured image is of protesters gathered in front of the Iranian Embassy in London, supporting anti-government demonstrations in Iran. Photo: Ben Stansall/AFP

Iranian protesters rally again, even after government opens fire on crowds, murdering five, injuring four — #IranProtests

We need to get arms to these people and help them usher in 2018, the year of freedom.

The mullahs don’t have their lapdog in the White House anymore.

President Trump said, “the world is watching.” Iran demonstrators face ‘iron fist’

IRAN PROTESTERS RALLY AGAIN, DEFYING WARNING OF CRACKDOWN

By Bozorgmehr Sharafedin, Reuters, December 31, 2017:

LONDON (Reuters) – Anti-government protesters demonstrated in Iran on Sunday in defiance of a warning by the authorities of a tough crackdown, extending for a fourth day one of the most audacious challenges to the clerical leadership since pro-reform unrest in 2009.

Police in the center of Tehran fired water cannon to try to disperse demonstrators, according to pictures on social media.

Video posted online also showed a clash between protesters and police in the city of Khoramdareh in Zanjan province in the country’s northwest. Reuters was unable immediately to verify the authenticity of the footage.

There were also reports of demonstrations in the cities of Sanandaj and Kermanshah in western Iran as well as Chabahar in the southeast and Ilam and Izeh in the southwest.

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EDITORS NOTE: This column originally appeared in The Geller Report.

Trump: Iranians fed up with regime’s ‘squandering of the nation’s wealth to fund terrorism abroad’

Much of that wealth, of course, came to them courtesy Barack Hussein Obama.

At last, a President who calls out injustice and stands with the genuinely oppressed.

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Osama bin Laden documents show Iran’s extensive aid to al-Qaeda

The Telegraph headline says that the documents “reveal” Iran’s “secret” dealings with al-Qaeda, but anyone who read my 2016 book The Complete Infidel’s Guide to Iran would already know that Iran collaborated with al-Qaeda, including in the preparations for the 9/11 jihad attacks.

Osama bin Laden

“Trove of Bin Laden documents reveal Iran’s secret dealings with al-Qaeda,” by Josie Ensor, Telegraph, November 1, 2017 (thanks to Lookmann):

A newly released trove of documents recovered from Osama bin Laden’s Pakistan compound have revealed “secret dealings” between Iran and al-Qaeda.

Nearly half a million files found on the computer seized in the May 2, 2011, US raid on the al-Qaeda founder’s hideout in Abbottabad were released by the CIA on Wednesday.

A never-before-seen 19-page document purportedly written by a senior member of al-Qaeda details an arrangement between Iran and members of the group to strike American interests in “Saudi Arabia and the Gulf.”

In exchange, Shia Iran offered Sunni militants “money, arms” and “training in Hizbollah camps in Lebanon.”

Iranian intelligence facilitated the travel of some operatives with visas, while sheltering others.

The author of the file, described as “well-connected,” explains that al-Qaeda’s forces violated the terms of the agreement of the deal, however, resulting in several men being detained.

Iranian connections to Hizballah and Palestinian militant groups, such as Hamas and Palestinian Islamic Jihad, are well-documented, but its ties to al-Qaeda have until now mostly been shrouded in secrecy.

The timing of the release comes as US President Donald Trump is trying to decertify a bilateral deal agreed with Iran to end its nuclear proliferation programme, which was negotiated by his predecessor Barack Obama and one which he has described as the “worst deal ever made”.

Mr Trump has been keen to portray Tehran as America’s greatest threat and will no doubt seize upon the documents as proof of the Islamic republic’s support for terrorism in the region.

Speaking at a national security seminar organised by the Foundation for the Defense of Democracies in Washington DC last month about the release of the documents, Mike Pompeo, CIA director, said al-Qaeda and Iran have always built “secret and open” ties.

Mr Pompeo attributed the relationship between the two parties to the fact that they view the West as a common enemy, referring to an “ideological consensus” of their cooperation against the West.

He added that the two sides did not fight against each other because they considered the West a greater threat to them….

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Trump designates Iran’s Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps a terrorist group

This is absolutely justified. Said Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin: “The IRGC has played a central role to Iran becoming the world’s foremost state sponsor of terror. We urge the private sector to recognize that the IRGC permeates much of the Iranian economy, and those who transact with IRGC-controlled companies do so at great risk.”

The announcement of this move said the group provides “support to a number of terrorist groups, including Hizballah and Hamas, as well as to the Taliban.”

Indeed. Find out just how bad the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps really is, and what it is doing in Iran and around the world, in my book The Complete Infidel’s Guide to Iran.

Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps

“Trump designates Iran Revolutionary Guard Corps as a terrorist group, calls for more sanctions,” by Joel Gehrke, Washington Examiner, October 13, 2017:

…”I am authorizing the Treasury Department to further sanction the entire Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps for its support for terrorism and to apply sanctions to its officials, agents, and affiliates,” Trump said in a White House speech.

“I urge our allies to join us in taking strong actions to curb Iran’s continued dangerous and destabilizing behavior,” Trump added.

“The IRGC has played a central role to Iran becoming the world’s foremost state sponsor of terror,” Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said Friday. “We urge the private sector to recognize that the IRGC permeates much of the Iranian economy, and those who transact with IRGC-controlled companies do so at great risk.”

As Trump spoke from the White House, the Treasury Department announced it was designating the IRGC as a terrorist entity under a White House Executive Order. That announcement said the group provides “support to a number of terrorist groups, including Hizballah and Hamas, as well as to the Taliban.”

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