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New York City censored anti-terror handbook to appease Muslims

This is an illustration of the truth about what I said last Thursday at Truman State University: that charges of “Islamophobia” and “racism” are used to hinder legitimate counter-terror efforts, thus paving the way for more jihad terror attacks.

nypd anti terror unit“The purge of a report on radical Islam has put NYC at risk,” by Paul Sperry, New York Post, April 15, 2017:

The NYPD has had a stellar track record of protecting the city from another 9/11, foiling more than 20 planned terrorist attacks since 2001. But some worry the department is losing its terror-fighting edge as it tries to please Muslim grievance groups.

Last year, for instance, it censored an anti-terror handbook to appease offended Muslims, even though it has accurately predicted radicalization patterns in recent “homegrown” terror cases. Rank-and-file NYPD officers, detectives and even intelligence and counterterrorism units are officially barred now from referring to the handbook or the scientific study on which it was based.

Former law-enforcement officials fear its removal as a training tool may be hurting efforts to prevent terrorist activity, such as the vehicle-ramming attacks plaguing European cities.

“The report was extremely accurate on how the radicalization process works and what indicators to look for,” said Patrick Dunleavy, former deputy inspector general of the New York state prisons’ criminal-intelligence division, who also worked with the NYPD’s intelligence division for several years.

Mayor de Blasio agreed in January 2016 to purge the remarkably prescient police training guide “Radicalization in the West: The Homegrown Threat” to help settle a federal lawsuit filed by the ACLU and Muslim groups who claimed the NYPD’s anti-terror training discriminated against Muslims.

Written 10 years ago, the seminal NYPD report detailing the religious steps homegrown terrorists take toward radicalization is now more relevant than ever, with recent terror suspects closely following those steps. But in 2007, the same year the study was released, the Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR) organized a protest against it, complaining it “casts suspicion on all US Muslims.” Even though federal law enforcement has long-shunned CAIR as a suspected terrorist front organization, “groups like CAIR were insistent on having it removed, and de Blasio caved into them,” Dunleavy said.

Under the city’s unusual settlement agreement, the NYPD as well as New York state agencies were forced to remove its 90-page anti-terror study — described by plaintiffs as “deeply flawed” and “inflammatory” — from databases and no longer rely on it “to open or extend investigations” into terrorist activities. Also, police must now commit to “mitigating the potential impact” of any counterterrorism investigation on the Muslim community.

The deal has had a chilling effect on other city police forces’ ability to use fact-based, trend analysis to develop terrorism cases, experts say. They warn that purging such studies deprives local law enforcement of the ability to understand how ISIS and other jihadists recruit, organize and operate — which is critical to disrupting terrorism plots.

“The FBI has its hands full with over 1,000 open cases on ISIS terrorist suspects already in the US,” former FBI Agent John Guandolo said, “and it needs the help of well-trained eyes and ears on the ground at the local and state level.”

“The bad guys know if police don’t know this stuff at the ground level, they win,” added Guandolo, who trains sheriffs departments across the country to ID local jihadi networks through his consulting firm, Understanding the Threat LLC.

The authors of the report, led by Mitch Silber, former NYPD director of intelligence analysis, examined hundreds of “homegrown” terrorism cases and found that suspects followed the same “radicalization” path. Key indicators include: alienating themselves from their former lives and friends; giving up cigarettes, drinking and partying; wearing traditional Islamic clothing; growing a beard; becoming obsessed with Mideast politics and jihad; and regularly attending a hardline mosque. In other words, the more they immersed themselves in their faith, the more radical they grew.

“You can take all the terrorist cases since that report and compare the information on the subject and the case and see stark similarities to what Mitch laid out,” Dunleavy noted.

The terrorists who carried out recent attacks in Boston; Fort Hood, Texas; Little Rock, Ark.; Chattanooga, Tenn.; San Bernardino, Fla.; Orlando; Philadelphia and at Ohio State University, among others, followed a similar pattern of radicalization. In each case, the Muslim attacker was influenced through “incubators of extremism” within the Muslim community, including Islamic student associations, schools, bookstores and mosques. Jihadi websites also played a role, but what unifies them all is Islamic doctrine. As the NYPD study found, “The ultimate objective for any attack is always the same — to punish the West, overthrow the democratic order, re-establish the caliphate, and institute Sharia,” or Islamic law.

“The radicalizer is Sharia, not the Internet,” said Philip Haney, a former Homeland Security counterterrorism analyst. Haney says the feds are plagued by their own PC censorship. Bowing to pressure from CAIR and other Muslim groups, Homeland Security and the Justice Department have purged anti-terrorism training materials and fired instructors deemed offensive to Muslims. CAIR-launched protests also helped convince the FBI to recently suspend an Internet program aimed at preventing the radicalization of Muslim youth.

“If we fail to correct this situation, it is inevitable that more attacks will occur,” warned Haney, author of “See Something, Say Nothing.”…

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Muslim Women’s Foiled bomb plot in New York City

This story quotes a Muslim professor saying that ‘for an undercover to be seeded in a community for that long without a specific target raises some deeply troubling questions about the direction of policing in our city.’ What should really raise some deeply troubling questions is that this program was ended by Mayor ‘Red Bill’ de Blasio, and that when it was ended, it was widely reported that it had not resulted in the foiling of a single plot, and only now is it revealed that this undercover agent exposed a jihad bombing plot in the city….That foiled plot should have been enough to show that the program was necessary and should continue. The undercover agent was seeded in the community for that long because for that long, and longer, there was a jihad threat within Muslim communities. That threat continues. This surveillance should have continued as well.

“NYPD officer ‘converted’ to Islam in order to go undercover and spy on Brooklyn College students which led to the arrest of two women accused of ‘building a bomb and planning to wage jihad in New York,’” Dailymail.com, October 31, 2015:

An NYPD officer pretended to be a Brooklyn College student at the Islamic Society in New York City, and taking the Muslim oath of faith, before befriending Muslim students to infiltrate the community.

The woman, who went by the name of Mel, short for Melike, spent four years earning the trust of Islamic students at the college as part of an NYPD operation to spy on Muslims, according to NY’s daily weblog Gothamist.

The controversial mission was part of the police departments well-documented plan that sees the blanket surveillance of innocent Muslims.

The Mayor of New York, Bill deBlasio has openly criticized such surveillance and declared at a Ramadan dinner that Muslim New Yorkers were ‘still fighting for basic human rights.’

‘We recently shut down the Demographics Unit at NYPD, which conducted surveillance on Muslim New Yorkers. Because it’s unfair to single out people on the sole basis of their religion,’ he added.

The undercover operation led to some important arrests. Four years after Mel had infiltrated the college, two Queens residents, Noelle Velentzas and Asia Siddiqui, were arrested and charged with allegedly planning to build a bomb.

The US Justice Department issued a release stating that the women were linked to members of al-Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula and the Islamic State.

It was revealed that a Detective from the NYPD’s Intelligence Bureau was heavily involved in bringing the women to justice.

Students who have since been made aware of the undercover operation have said how they now feel violated after discovering Mel’s true identity.

‘You trust someone, you talk to them. And they were just gathering information about your community,’ a student said.

‘I grew up here. To have this happen because of your religion, or your political views, it’s scary. You feel alienated. And you don’t feel like this is your home,’ she added.

Three Brooklyn College graduates who had been close to the undercover officer told Gothamist of the intimate ties she developed with Muslim students and her presence during some of the most private moments of their lives.

Mel immersed herself in the student community, attending Islamic education classes, social gatherings, and trips to museums and the aquarium.

Professor Ramzi Kassem at CUNY School of Law and director of the school’s Creating Law Enforcement Accountability & Responsibility (CLEAR) project said that ‘for an undercover to be seeded in a community for that long without a specific target raises some deeply troubling questions about the direction of policing in our city.’

New York attorney Gideon Orion Oliver explained to Gothamist how undercover detectives ‘develop really profound and predatory relationships with their targets,’ to create an intimate bond of trust between them.

After spending so much time and getting to know a vast amount of the target’s life, ‘the government and the undercover officers have significant roles in manufacturing what they then characterize as the defendants’ plots,’ Oliver said.

Many of the cases dealt with by the NYPD often involve a form of ‘entrapment’ that see undercover detectives and FBI informants carrying out manipulative tactics in order to secure evidence that will later lead to arrests.

In the case of Velentzas and Siddiqui, four propane gas tanks, as well as instructions for how to turn them into explosive devices, are said to have been found in Siddiqui’s home, and according to the criminal complaint, the two women had in-depth conversations with the undercover officer about their violent aspirations.

The undercover officer established a friendship with at least one of the women as early as 2013, according to the criminal complaint.

The two women are not alleged to have been in the process of planning a specific attack, and according to the criminal complaint, Velentzas repeatedly stated she would not want to harm any ‘regular’ people, instead targeting police or military personnel.

After 9/11, both the NYPD and the FBI revamped their approach to terrorism investigations and began operating under a policy of preventive prosecution.

The NYPD began to look for particular indicators of radicalization such as the ‘wearing of traditional Islamic clothing,’ giving up drinking or smoking, and ‘becoming involved in social activism.’

In the NYPD’s model of measuring threats, which have been criticized, young people were also a key target.

‘The government – often acting through informants – is actively involved in developing [terrorism plots], persuading and sometimes pressuring the target to participate, and providing the resources to carry it out,’ according to the 2014 Human Rights Watch report.

Meanwhile, Brooklyn College authorities have denied having any knowledge of the undercover operation at the campus and have said they were not notified of such activity by the NYPD.

Specific guidelines expressly prohibit the NYPD from monitoring political or religious organizations unless there is suspicion of a crime taking place.

In this case, it appears ‘Mel’ was assigned to the school to observe Muslim students out of mere curiosity.

Brooklyn College students at the Islamic Society told Gothamist they feel skeptical and paranoid.

‘In the back of all our minds, there’s always that suspicion, that either, you are a spy, or you think I’m one,’ a female Muslim student stressed.

‘We’re acting like criminals, even though we haven’t done anything,’ she said.

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