United Methodist Church under fire for anti-Semitism — and also enables jihad terror

The political goal of the “Christ at the Checkpoint Conference” in Oklahoma was to “flip American Christian support for Israel to the Palestinians.”

 In the wake of the synagogue shooting last week in Pittsburgh, activists from several mainline Protestant churches came under fire for promoting a culture of anti-Semitism in their churches, especially the United Methodist Church.

The worst offenders are usually activists affiliated with the Presbyterian Church USA (PCUSA) and the United Church of Christ (UCC). But this year, the activists and officials from the United Methodist Church took on a leading role by hosting the controversial “Christ at the Checkpoint Conference” in Oklahoma.

Anti-semitism in the churches is longstanding, and while most of these churches are quick to claim that they’re apolitical, they are, in fact, very political. They condemn Israel and embrace the jihadist Palestinian agenda, claiming that the Palestinians are an oppressed group. They apparently know nothing of history and nothing of the jihadist agenda to obliterate Israel, as is articulated in the PLO, Hamas and Fatah charters. Or they pretend not to know in the face of charges of anti-Semitism.

The Christ at the Checkpoint Conference in Oklahoma is an offshoot of Christ at the Checkpoint Conference in Bethlehem. Some details of the latter’s cringeworthy record:

 In late 2010, Israeli tour guide Kay Wilson and her visiting Christian friend, Kristine Luken, were attacked by Palestinian terrorists outside Jerusalem. Luken was killed and Wilson suffered severe injuries. Wilson approached one of the CATC speakers about speaking at the 2012 convocation, but was told that her story was “not what the Lord wants,” a phrase that is sadly abused by some Christian leaders to exercise control — akin to a kind of spiritual or psychological extortion — over the follower. Wilson then expressed dismay about “how any Israeli…. Messianic believer, could justify participating in a conference that has chosen to associate itself with theologians advocating Replacement Theology and Palestinian officials with clear ties to recognized terrorist organizations.” She further stated, “For any self-respecting person, and especially for Israelis such as myself, the endorsement of terror by association, at a Christian conference, is obscene.”

Obscene it is. Such churches not only embrace anti-Semitism, but also empower jihad terror. Recently, the Palestinian Archbishop Atallah Hanna called evangelical Christians “enemies of the Christian values” for supporting Israel, and claimed that they “do not belong to Christianity at all.”

“United Methodist Church under fire for anti-Semitism,” JNS News, November 1, 2018:

The political goal of the “Christ at the Checkpoint Conference” in Oklahoma was to flip American Christian support for Israel to the Palestinians.

In the wake of the synagogue shooting last week in Pittsburgh, activists from several mainline Protestant churches came under fire for promoting a culture of anti-Semitism in their churches, especially the United Methodist Church.

The worst offenders are usually activists affiliated with the Presbyterian Church USA (PCUSA) and the United Church of Christ (UCC). But this year, the activists and officials from the United Methodist Church took on a leading role by hosting the controversial “Christ at the Checkpoint Conference” in Oklahoma.

The political goal of the conference was to flip American Christian support for Israel to the Palestinians. The conference soon took on a more sinister tone.

At one point, a speaker put up a slide of U.S. President Donald Trump surrounded by three of his advisers. The speaker asked the audience what was wrong with the picture.

Audience members answered that the problem was that they were Jews, apparently angry that the American president had Jewish advisors involved in the effort to achieve a peace deal.

Dexter Van Zile, a Christian scholar for CAMERA, reported about the conference. He told JNS: “At the time, when the audience was complaining about Jews in the Trump administration, I was disgusted at their flagrant anti-Semitism. But now, after hearing that the Pittsburgh gunman said the American government was ‘infested’ with Jews, I feel more than shaken by how it echoes what I heard at the Methodist-organized conference.”

“The notions of Jewish cruelty, corruption and infestation—those were all themes at the conference,” said Van Zile. “It’s now, literally, lethal rhetoric.”

The United Methodist Church’s struggle with anti-Semitism goes back several years…

EDITORS NOTE: This column with images originally appeared on Jihad Watch. It is republished with permission. The featured image is from the CATCUSA Facebook.

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