Pope Francis’s new Morocco logo implies submission to Islam

“Why Does Pope Francis’s New Morocco Logo Imply Submission To Islam?” Because he has submitted. Pope Francis has become a defender of Islam.

“If this Vatican logo tells us anything, it is that Pope Francis is comfortable with Islam’s ascendency….This crescent does not appear alongside the cross, as if a companion to it. Rather, the Islamic symbol encircles the Christian one. What passes for a cross is feeble, barely recognizable.”

The Grand Imam of Cairo’s al-Azhar, Ahmed al-Tayeb, has also extended his gratitude and thanked the Pope for his “defense of Islam against the accusation of violence and terrorism.” Christianity is still waiting for the Pope to defend it against widespread Islamic persecution.

“Why Does Pope Francis’s New Morocco Logo Imply Submission To Islam?,” by Maureen Mullarkey, The Federalist , January 22, 2019:

St. Francis of Assisi traveled to Egypt in 1219 with the Fifth Crusade, determined to proclaim the truth of the gospel to Sultan al-Malik al-Kamil. Celebratory anticipation of the 800th anniversary of that meeting between saint and sultan began two years ago with Pope Francis’ trip to Egypt. Initiated by the Franciscans, the extended jubilee culminates this March with a papal visit to Morocco.

Vatican media foregoes the traditional papal insignia in promotion of this trip. Apropos of our age of slogans and Instagram politicking, it has chosen instead a logo created specifically for the event. Vatican News explained the choice: “A cross and a crescent . . . are symbols of Christianity and Islam which highlight the interreligious relation between Christians and Muslims.”

Interreligious relation is an airy trope drawn from the optimism of Pope John Paul II. During a memorable 1986 inter-faith convention in Assisi, John Paul hailed “the seeds of truth found in all religions.” He sealed the words with a respectful kiss on a Koran. A balmy ménage of many-colored pieties and alternative practitioners, the event buoyed enthusiasm for religious relativism. Its pan-religious sentimentality survives in the current pope’s apparent embrace of Islam as morally equivalent to Judeo-Christian ethos and culture.

Since 1986, Islam’s character and purposes have become clearer. Evidence of the scale of its distance from Assisi’s cross-cultural smorgasbord of religious impulses has sharpened. If this Vatican logo tells us anything, it is that Pope Francis is comfortable with Islam’s ascendency. The “relation” made visual here is one of domination. Take a look.

This crescent does not appear alongside the cross, as if a companion to it. Rather, the Islamic symbol encircles the Christian one. What passes for a cross is feeble, barely recognizable….

EDITORS NOTE: This Jihad Watch column with images is republished with permission. The featured photo is by Xavier Coiffic on Unsplash.

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