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Muslims murder five girls for clapping while male dancers performed at wedding ceremony

Note that the families of the girls tried to cover up their murders.

Muslims commit 91 percent of honor killings worldwide. The Palestinian Authority gives pardons or suspended sentences for honor murders. Iraqi women have asked for tougher sentences for Islamic honor murderers, who get off lightly now. Syria in 2009 scrapped a law limiting the length of sentences for honor killings, but “the new law says a man can still benefit from extenuating circumstances in crimes of passion or honour ‘provided he serves a prison term of no less than two years in the case of killing.’” And in 2003 the Jordanian Parliament voted down on Islamic grounds a provision designed to stiffen penalties for honor killings. Al-Jazeera reported that “Islamists and conservatives said the laws violated religious traditions and would destroy families and values.”

Until the encouragement Islamic law gives to honor killing is acknowledged and confronted, more women will suffer.

“Four men in police custody for allegedly killing five girls for ‘honour’ in Kohistan in 2012,” by Atif Qayum, Samaa, November 29, 2018 (thanks to The Religion of Peace):

Four suspects have been arrested by the Kohistan police for the alleged honour killing of five girls in 2012. They were remanded to police custody for eight days.

The girls were killed in the Palas area in 2012 for clapping while male dancers performed at a wedding ceremony.

The Supreme Court had ordered the registration of an FIR in June and on August 1 an FIR was registered against the suspects. Kolai-Palas district police officer Iftikhar Khan had told the media on August 1 that the police registered the FIR under Section 364 of the Pakistan Penal Code. He said if the girls weren’t found, then the police could add Section 302 of the Code of Criminal Procedure to the FIR and arrest suspected killers.

The suspects – two fathers and two brothers of the girls — were arrested and presented before a judicial magistrate, who ordered their eight-day remand. They are being questioned about where the girls’ bodies were buried.

The girls were killed on the orders of a village Jirga. Afzal Kohistani had petitioned the Supreme Court in the matter after his three brothers were also killed after being seen dancing in the video that went viral on social media.

The Supreme Court had earlier ordered an investigation to ascertain whether the girls were alright following conflicting reports of their wellbeing. The families said they were in good health, while others said they had been killed. A judicial commission formed by the top court and headed by the Kohistan district and session judge had revealed that the families actually produced other underage girls and tried to pass them off as the girls seen in the video….

EDITORS NOTE: This column with images originally appeared on Jihad Watch. It is republished with permission. The featured photo is by rawpixel on Unsplash.

World Hijab Day encourages non-Muslims to don hijabs in solidarity with Muslims, ignores victims of forced veiling

Once again non-Muslim women will signal their virtue by donning a hijab. But where is their concern for the women who have been brutalized and even killed for not wearing the hijab? Do the women who will happily participate in World Hijab Day care about Aqsa Parvez, whose Muslim father choked her to death with her hijab after she refused to wear it. Or Amina Muse Ali, a Christian woman in Somalia whom Muslims murdered because she wasn’t wearing a hijab? Have they shown any concern for the 40 women who were murdered in Iraq in 2007 for not wearing the hijab; or for Alya Al-Safar, whose Muslim cousin threatened to kill her and harm her family because she stopped wearing the hijab in Britain; or for Amira Osman Hamid, who faced whipping in Sudan for refusing to wear the hijab; or for the Egyptian girl, also named Amira, who committed suicideafter being brutalized by her family for refusing to wear the hijab; or for the Muslim and non-Muslim teachers at the Islamic College of South Australia who were told they had to wear the hijab or be fired; or for the women in Chechnya whom police shot with paintballs because they weren’t wearing hijab; or for the women in Chechnya who were threatened by men with automatic rifles for not wearing hijab; or for the elementary school teachers in Tunisia who were threatened with deathfor not wearing hijab; or for the Syrian schoolgirls who were forbidden to go to school unless they wore hijab; or for the women in Gaza whom Hamas has forced to wear hijab; or for the women in Iran who protested against the regime, even before the recent uprising, by daring to take off their hijabs; or for the women in London whom Muslim thugs threatened to murder if they didn’t wear hijab; or for the anonymous young Muslim woman who doffed her hijab outside her home and started living a double life in fear of her parents; or for the fifteen girls in Saudi Arabia who were killed when the religious police wouldn’t let them leave their burning school building because they had taken off their hijabs in their all-female environment; or for the girl in Italy whose mother shaved her head for not wearing hijab; or for all the other women and girls who have been killed or threatened, or who live in fear for daring not to wear the hijab?

Courageous women in the Islamic Republic of Iran are taking off their hijabs as a sign of resistance to the oppressive Sharia regime under which they live, and at least 29 women have been arrested for doing so. Who is standing in solidarity with them? Not the participants in World Hijab Day.

“World Hijab Day Encourages All Women to Wear Veil in Solidarity with Muslims,” by Edwin Mora, Breitbart, December 26, 2018 (thanks to the Geller Report):

The World Hijab Day (WHD) non-profit organization launched its 2019 campaign Wednesday, encouraging women and girls of all faiths, backgrounds, and ethnicities to “voice their choice” of wearing the headscarf for 24 hours on February 1, in solidarity with Muslim women across the world.

“#FreeInHijab is the much-needed hashtag for our current global situation where women in hijab are labeled by media as oppressed and symbolically imprisoned,” Nazma Khan told Turkey’s state-run Anadolu Agency (AA).

“Through this hashtag, women are encouraged to voice their choice of wearing the hijab; thus dispelling common misconceptions,” Khan added.

Each year since its inception in 2013, WHD has invited women to wear a hijab — a headscarf worn by Muslim women — for one day on February 1.

“Perhaps, this one-day experience will make them see the hijab in a different light,” Khan told AA.

“More than 70 global ambassadors from over 45 countries have been involved, and women from around 190 countries participate in the annual event,” Al Jazeera notedlast year.

Khan explained that WHD’s 2019 motto is “Breaking Stereotypes, Shattering Boundaries,” noting that the campaign also includes “promoting World Hijab Day both online and offline globally.”

Each year, the non-profit organization prepares for World Hijab Day weeks in advance.

In 2017, WHD became a nonprofit organization focused on fighting discrimination against Muslim women through awareness and education, according to the organization’s official webpage.

Khan has told several news outlets that the hardships she faced growing up in New York City due to her hijab motivated her to establish World Hijab Day.

“I was constantly bullied in middle school and high school. Discrimination took on a different height after 9/11,” she said, referring to the Sept. 11, 2001 attacks in the United States.

She added, “Every day, I would face different challenges just walking on the street; I was chased, spat on, surrounded by goons, called a terrorist, Osama bin Laden, etc.”

Khan described her experience as “devastating,” adding that she did not want anyone else to go through the same thing.

“Therefore, I thought to myself, if I could invite sisters from all faiths and backgrounds to walk in my shoes just for a day, perhaps things would change,” she said.

In 2017, New York state and the House of Commons of the U.K. recognized February 1 as World Hijab Day. The Scottish Parliament and the Philippines have reportedly followed suit.

Khan dismissed accusations that the organization is spreading a political Islam ideology….

EDITORS NOTE: This column with images originally appeared on Jihad Watch. It is republished with permission. The featured photo is by أخٌ في الله … on Unsplash.

23 Million Nigerian Girls are Victims of Child Marriage

Over 23 million girls in Nigeria are victims of child marriage. 32 million, meanwhile, have suffered female genital mutilation as well. But what do these practices have to do with Islam? Bukhari 5.58.234 and Umdat al-Salik e4.3, respectively. And as they foster mass migration and open borders, globalists apparently believe that deeply ingrained religious indoctrination magically disappears upon migration. And just in case they do not disappear, everyone else must accept such practices, because it is “Islamophobic” not to do so.

Already the UK is considering raising the minimum age of marriage in order to try to stop forced child marriage.

 “U.N.: 23 Million Girls in Nigeria Are Victims of Child Marriage,” by Edwin Mora, Breitbart, December 3, 2018:

Over 23 million girls in Nigeria are victims of child marriage, the country representative for the United Nations Entity for Gender Equality and the Empowerment of Women revealed Sunday amid a campaign against gender-based violence in the African country.

Nigeria’s Leadership newspaper cited Comfort Lamptey, the U.N. Women’s country representative to Nigeria, as indicating on Sunday that “one in three women and girls aged 15-24 has been [a] victim of violence while one in five has experienced physical violence which is the highest in Africa.”

“She also said for too long, many women and girls have been subjected to various forms of violence, yet have remained silent due to impunity, stigma, and shame, among other inhibiting factors,” Leadership noted.

“With women and girls bearing the brunt of abduction, forced marriage and being used as human bombs [by Boko Haram]. Gender-based violence is evident also in the political realm, where women have reported numerous cases of victimization, intimidation, and harassment, in order to sideline them in the upcoming 2019 General Elections,” Lamptey said.

Violence against women takes many forms in Africa. Last month, Kenyan authorities sentenced a mother to six years for forcing her 13-year-old twin daughters to undergo female genital mutilation (FGM) “to avoid a curse from her deceased grandfather,” Reuters reported.

Referring to the recent conviction in Kenya, Mercy Chege, the director at the Plan International charity that rescued the twin girls, told Reuters, “A community member alerted us when they had heard the mother was organizing the girls to undergo the cut, so we informed the local authorities. Unfortunately, we were not able to prevent the circumcision as by the time the police conducted the raid and rescued the girls, they had already been cut.”…

EDITORS NOTE: This column with images originally appeared on Jihad Watch. It is republished with permission. The featured photo is by Joshua Oluwagbemiga on Unsplash.